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Beginner accessories

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Beginner accessories

Postby HDAV » Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:18 pm

As a frustrated cabinet owner for the time being but with xmas around the corner I was wondering what accessories were reconmended for a beginner?

Most likely random/sporadic clay shooting, perhaps some rough/vermin and once in a blue moon a proper posh shoot?

Gun likely to be 12g S/S for forseable unless i get seduced in the meantime, if i can find somewhere to regularly shoot i fancy a moderated pump 3" .410 for some reason
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby humperdingle » Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:35 pm

Don't go overboard... You don't need every bit of kit despite how much you think you might!

A good quality cleaning kit.
Suitable gun oil - I tend to use legia mostly.
Snap caps - Some say you don't need them, but I had a firing pin propel itself down the barrel whilst dry-firing.
Decent gun case or slip.
Good pair of hearing protectors.
Cartridge bag if you're doing a fair bit of clays.
Lots and lots of cartridges :grin:

Some of the popular things to get which I've never seen much point in:

Fibre optic bead.
Clay shooter's vest (again, if you're doing a lot of clays, might be useful)
Cartridge belt - Can't really get used to using them.
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby Beer Hunter » Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:36 pm

Lessons - lots of lessons :)

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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby HDAV » Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:50 pm

Beer Hunter wrote:Lessons - lots of lessons :)

Kev.

Sounds like Golf!

Cheers chaps are snap caps only for use when dry firing? I have seen them and didnt quite get the point.

Also whats special about a cartridge bag? And whats a fibre optic bead?
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby humperdingle » Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:59 pm

HDAV wrote:
Beer Hunter wrote:Lessons - lots of lessons :)

Kev.

Sounds like Golf!

Cheers chaps are snap caps only for use when dry firing? I have seen them and didnt quite get the point.

Also whats special about a cartridge bag? And whats a fibre optic bead?


If you're doing lots of clays - 100-150 in a session - Carrying cartridges about is much easier with a bag to carry them in. Most will hold 100 or so. If you take it rough shooting, it will hold 50 cartridges, a small flask and a couple of sarnies ;)

Yes, use snap caps in a shotgun when putting away to store (after dry-firing). Most modern guns will cope very well with the spring under compression, but snap caps are easy to use and cheap.

A fibre optic bead replaces the std brass bead at the end of a shotgun barrel. IMO they just make you watch the clay less.
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby URX » Sat Nov 28, 2009 12:17 am

humperdingle wrote:Don't go overboard... You don't need every bit of kit despite how much you think you might!

A good quality cleaning kit.
Suitable gun oil - I tend to use legia mostly.
Snap caps - Some say you don't need them, but I had a firing pin propel itself down the barrel whilst dry-firing.
Decent gun case or slip.
Good pair of hearing protectors.
Cartridge bag if you're doing a fair bit of clays.
Lots and lots of cartridges :grin:

Some of the popular things to get which I've never seen much point in:

Fibre optic bead.
Clay shooter's vest (again, if you're doing a lot of clays, might be useful)
Cartridge belt - Can't really get used to using them.

what he said
only cartridge belts are great when you are ambushing geese from a hide
you can get to carts wehn pockets are impossible ;-)
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby HDAV » Sat Nov 28, 2009 12:31 am

humperdingle wrote:Yes, use snap caps in a shotgun when putting away to store (after dry-firing). Most modern guns will cope very well with the spring under compression, but snap caps are easy to use and cheap.


Ah I get it they are used to release the firing pin when empty...the gun i am hopefully getting hasn't been used in a long time so will be going in for a service/check with a pro gun smith before getting used but if caps werent used are the firing pin springs likely to buggered? It may have caps in but i doubt it....
Last edited by HDAV on Sat Nov 28, 2009 10:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby willie » Sat Nov 28, 2009 11:41 am

humperdingle wrote:Don't go overboard... You don't need every bit of kit despite how much you think you might!

A good quality cleaning kit.
Suitable gun oil - I tend to use legia mostly.
Snap caps - Some say you don't need them, but I had a firing pin propel itself down the barrel whilst dry-firing.
Decent gun case or slip.
Good pair of hearing protectors.
Cartridge bag if you're doing a fair bit of clays.
Lots and lots of cartridges :grin:

Some of the popular things to get which I've never seen much point in:

Fibre optic bead.
Clay shooter's vest (again, if you're doing a lot of clays, might be useful)
Cartridge belt - Can't really get used to using them.



Pretty much as above, although I have never put a snap cap anywhere near my Baikal for 22 years. For rough shooting
I would add Real tree cammo jacket and trousers, and they must be waterproof, hat with a skip, this will help keep you
dry but will also cast a shadow over your face, add to this a face mask or cammo neck scarf and this should render you
almost covered.Oh, and cammo neoprene gloves, like marigolds, but cammo :oops: and suitable footwear.
And decent glass for the field.
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby normanb » Sun Nov 29, 2009 12:55 pm

First get your gun .The rest will come with time
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby libensvolenspotens » Sun Nov 29, 2009 2:28 pm

First priority is hearing protection!!!! Either plugs or muffs your choice but don't do without! You can't renew damaged hearing!
If you want to shoot clays, most grounds will require eye protection in the form of shooting glasses. C.P.S.A. & W.C.T.S.A.
(Clay Pigeon Shooters Association & Welsh Clay Target Shooters Association) require them to be used or insurance is invalidated.
Cheap & simple gadget for Xmas is a barrel protector - leather "fob" that fits on your shoe with a pop stud. Allows you to rest the weight of the gun on your foot without damaging your barrels or shoes (Around £8) simple but very handy!
You are entering the zone of endless spending so be wary, tread carefully and take one step at a time ;)
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby HDAV » Sun Nov 29, 2009 11:20 pm

I saw a range kit of glasses muffs and plugs for £30 (deep blue maybe) so that may well go on the Xmas list and that foot rest thing sounds like a good idea.

EDIT: Is this anygood for £20 http://www.breconretail.co.uk/browning- ... -591-p.asp

Cheers dave, I presume if hiring gun from range they include the PPE, Do gun dealers do January sales?
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby scarecrow » Thu Dec 03, 2009 12:45 am

For clay shooting ear protection.
For rough shooting, as above plus a decent knife & sharpening kit.
If it goes bang or has a nipple I want to fondle it.
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby maltoid » Thu Dec 03, 2009 7:00 pm

A flask either hip or thermos and an old christmas fave thick wooly socks
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby HDAV » Thu Dec 03, 2009 7:50 pm

maltoid wrote:A flask either hip or thermos and an old christmas fave thick wooly socks


A mates GF is buying him some "seal Skin" Socks apperently total waterproof, anyone ever used them?
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Re: Beginner accessories

Postby beanwood » Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:11 am

Beat you too it by about 6 months. Don't you just want to buy those toys :grin: :grin: :grin: !!!! My experience to date, as I shoot clays primarily, is a shooting vest, and some good hearing protection.

Shooting vest - any old thing will do, as long as it fits, and has large enough pockets for 50 cartridges.

Ear protection - I tried all sorts of ear protectors - but couldn't quite bring myself to spend the cash on a pair of Peltor's as recommended by a comprehensive review on this very site. When a pair of XP's came up reasonably (After spending £30 on lesser products :( ), I bought them - and they are EXCELLENT. The risk is without good kit, you'll take them off to chat when not shooting, and still be exposed to problem noise levels.

Snap caps - My gunsmith told me not to bother with, unless you have an old gun, that doesn't use coil springs.

If you come up with some 'must have' ideas though, let me know - Mrs B is on the look out for Xmas pressies ;)
HTH

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